China Holidays with Wendy Wu


China today is an ancient culture reinvented; whilst some aspects of life remain as they have for thousands of years, many aspects are being embellished by state-of-the-art modernity.

From the magnificent sights on everybody’s bucket list - the Great Wall and Terracotta Warriors to name a few - to roly-poly Giant Pandas, vibrant mega-metropolises like Shanghai and Hong Kong and serene landscapes, such as the spectacular Li River, China is as diverse, complex and rich as a whole continent. Every province brings a new set of flavours to its cuisine and a new range of beliefs, philosophies and cultures – so explore this amazing country with the world’s number one tour operator in this country Wendy Wu Tours
Explore China in the best way possible: your way. Whether you choose one of their award winning guided group tours or prefer tailormade holidays to Asia, the Wendy Wu China travel experts have it in hand.

Things To See In China
No trip to China would be complete without seeing one of these wonders
China’s most iconic sight, the Great Wall of China winds its way through the stark landscapes of north China, roughly tracing the southern edge of Inner Mongolia. In 220 BC Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who united China, began to join together earlier fortifications to create a wall that would keep out marauding hordes from the north. It wasn’t until the Ming dynasty started building between the 14th and 17th centuries that the wall we see today started to take shape
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Stretching from Shanhaiguan on the Bohai Sea to Lop Lake in the Gobi Desert – around 4,000 miles, the wall has long been seen as a symbol of power and strength, but also as a barrier between China and the rest of the world. It was given UNESCO World Heritage Status in 1987. There are many sections of the wall easily accessible from Beijing – whether you want an easy walk and well preserved, or a slightly wilder, snaking-through-the-barren-hills type experience, the Great Wall can only be one of the most exciting, magnificent and unbelievable things you’ll ever see.

In 1974 a group of farmers stumbled across one of the world’s greatest archaeological finds whilst digging a well. Over 40 years later, a huge subterranean necropolis covering an area of 22-square-miles has been unveiled, with 16 pits and thousands of figures, all surrounding the huge burial mound. All this creates a representation of the court of Qin Shi Huang, the emperor who united the warring factions and bought about what is pretty much the China we know today.

What the farmers revealed that day was just one section of a huge terracotta army, created to protect Qin Shi Huang in the afterlife. Each warrior is exquisite, with a unique facial expression, hair styles, their height determined by their rank, their own weapons, all standing in battle formation alongside horses and chariots. You can visit the original three pits to gaze over the sentinel rows and learn more about the more recent excavations that have been taking place.

Sichuan province is home to 80% of the world’s population of giant pandas, so it’s not a surprise that the province is at the forefront of the conservation effort to save them. It is also no surprise, given their adorable persona, that the panda has long been a national symbol of China. As an increasingly endangered species, the protection of this lovable bear from extinction is a top priority for China, and the frontrunner in this mission is the Chengdu Panda Research Base, located just 10 kilometres north of Chengdu's city centre.

With over 80 pandas in residence, the Chengdu Panda Research Base is first and foremost a conservation and breeding centre, working to protect the panda and maintain, if not increase, their numbers. The park is set up to resemble the mountain and forest regions in north Sichuan with extensive bamboo trees and large green spaces, mirroring the pandas’ natural habitat. There are also a population of red pandas calling the base home, which are equally as fun to watch!


Literally and metaphorical at the heart of Beijing, the vast expanse of Tiananmen Square covers over 100 acres making it one of the largest public squares in the world. It was here, in 1949, that Chairman Mao Zedong declared the founding of the People's Republic of China, especially symbolic with the Forbidden City, the symbol of imperial China, close by.

Around the square sits one of the city's most iconic structures. To the south stands Qianmen Gate the original gate into the city from the Ming Dynasty. To the west is the Great Hall of the People, the meeting place of the National People's Congress whilst to the east stands the National Museum of China which houses artefacts and cultural relics from China's extensive history. The Forbidden City is to north, with a portrait of Chairman Mao at its gate, looking out over the square. Perhaps the most famous building on the square is Chairman Mao Zedong Memorial Hall, Soviet-style mausoleum that contains the embalmed body of the leader.


The Imperial Palace from 1420 to 1912, the Forbidden City was once the centre of the Chinese universe as the seat of the emperors of the Ming and Qing dynasty. Located just off Tiananmen Square, the magnificent buildings still dominate the centre of Beijing; over 180 acres of exquisite and ornate traditional Chinese palatial architecture, built to an exact symmetry and geometry to achieve the perfect balance of yin and yang. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

The Forbidden City, is the world’s largest palace complex and China’s best preserved collection of ancient building. It is known as the ‘forbidden’ city due to the fact it was off limits for 500 years to commoners, unless they were expressly invited, and has 980 buildings within its moat and turreted walls. Whilst the buildings themselves are grandiose and beautiful, you’ll also find a wealth of dynastic artefacts inside – the very best way to glimpse what life was like for the emperor in Imperial China.


Built in the early 15th century, the Temple of Heaven is a complex of magnificent religious buildings in the heart of Beijing, set in the 267 hectares of the Temple of Heaven Park. The temple perfectly displays the unity of Confucian design, the layout of the buildings placed to symbolise the relationship between earth and heaven and the complex as a whole to promote balance and harmony.
Technically an alter rather than a temple, the site was used by the Ming and Qing dynasties for biannual ceremonies where the emperor, as ‘Son of Heaven’, would pray for a good harvest at the beautiful Hall of Prayer. Surrounding the temple are extensive grounds dotted with groves of old trees, gardens and walkways, which are used by local people to gather and practice Tai Chi, play chess or socialise. The Temple of Heaven was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998.  

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