Japan with Wendy Wu Tours


Japan is truly timeless, a place where ancient traditions are fused with modern life, blending seamlessly together. A  holiday to Japan you’ll find a dynamic culture that effortlessly and intriguingly combines the ultra-modern and pop culture trends with deeply traditional values.

Japan is the country which brings us every much needed and aspiration gadgets , the bright lights and glassy towers of Tokyo melt effortlessly with the splendour of a Kyoto geisha dance to the spare beauty of a Zen rock garden, or maybe taking in the more traditional aspects of Japanese culture like the bathhouses or sleeping on futons and tatami mats.



So from the islands of imperial treasures and tranquil temples marooned amongst futuristic cities like Tokyo. Head out into the country though, and you’ll find another world, be it in the shadow of Mount Fuji or amongst the peaks of Koyasan.

The people are welcoming, the cuisine divine, the landscapes second to none, the culture rich – what more could a traveller want on their holiday in Japan?

Things To See In Japan
No trip to Japan would be complete without seeing one of these wonders

Mt Fuji  




The iconic image of Japan and captured in numerous works of art and poetry, the perfectly symmetrical cone of Mount Fuji has been admired and revered for centuries by the Japanese and visitors alike. At 3,776 metres in height, it is Japan’s tallest mountain, and an active volcano (the last eruption was 1707), set amongst the beautiful panoramas of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, as well as one of Japan’s three holy mountains. Made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2013, Fuji is notorious for having its peak in the clouds but on a clear day, you can admire its inspiring peak all the way from Tokyo!

Built in the 14th century as a residence for a retired shogun, Kinkakuji is one of Japan’s best known and most admired buildings. Turned into a Zen Temple on the shogun’s death, the temple became a place of peace and tranquillity in a quiet corner of Kyoto – its main hall covered in layers of gold leaf, its beauty captured in the rippling waters of a reflecting pool. Set in lovely gardens, the temple is unmissable in any season – be it snowy in the winter, amongst the cherry blossom or red and orange leaves in spring and autumn, or backed by lush greenery in the summer. Kinkakuji is one of the 17 sites and monuments that are UNESCO World Heritage-listed in Kyoto

Located in the heart of Hiroshima, the Peace Memorial Park is a peaceful, green expanse dedicated to the memory of those who died when, or due to the effects of, the atomic bomb being dropped on the city in 1945. Created in 1954, the park encompasses a number of memorials including the Memorial Cenotaph, which stands over a stone chest that holds the names of all the bomb’s victims, the Children’s Peace Monument, and the Flame of Peace. Also here is the Peace Memorial Museum and the striking Atomic Bomb Dome. A place of reflection and education, the park is Hiroshima’s way of contributing to a more peaceful world in the future, and it is done beautifully.

Koya San  




Nestled in a high valley, secluded amongst lush forest and surrounded by 8 mountain peaks, Koya San was founded as a monastic complex in 816. Since then it has grown into a vibrant settlement with over 100 temples and a religious studies university, the whole area a place of sacred pilgrimage. Whilst not a place that lives in the past, it is a place to catch a glimpse of age-old traditions, beliefs and philosophies, as well as being able to enjoy some outstanding natural beauty. Don’t miss the chance to wander Okunoin, a vast, stupa-filled cemetery, through which you’ll reach the breathtaking Hall of Lanterns, where 10,000 oil lamps are permanently alight.

Amazing places to see in Japan

Kyoto  




The image of classical Japan, Kyoto was Japan’s capital for over 1,000 years, taking over from Nara in the 8th century and replaced by Tokyo in the 19th. The city has learned the art of balancing its incredibly old, rich culture (17 sites are listed as UNESCO World Heritage here) with the contemporary world, meaning you can explore anything from ancient Buddhist temples and elaborate palaces to the art of manga and nouveau cuisine. Long a centre of religion, culture, food and art, it is in the quiet backstreets and tranquil temples that Kyoto’s traditional soul dwells – hurrying between engagements with the flawless geisha, in the tea ceremony or in the quiet contemplation of a Zen garden – whilst it can be easy to miss, it’s also easy to find.

Tokyo  




One of the world’s largest cities, Tokyo is huge and fascinating place, a patchwork of districts and neighbourhoods, each with their own personality, that form one sprawling, constantly-regenerating whole. Providing the ultimate future-reaching cityscape, if you search deeper amongst the soaring glass towers and neon signs, you’ll find a destination still deeply rooted in tradition; tranquil pockets of the old-ways at the heart of temples and down quiet alleyways.
With so much rich culture to explore, a fantastic foodie scene, unique fashions and trends and a breathtaking contrast of cutting edge and old, a holiday to Tokyo is an epic city experience.

Osaka 




Japan’s third largest city, Osaka is Tokyo’s rebellious younger sibling, doing its best to assert its independence and quirky personality. Long Japan’s trading hub, it is a wealthy city that absolutely loves its food – so much so it has the nickname ‘Japan’s Kitchen’, so be prepared to taste as much as you can! ‘Kuidaore’ which means roughly ‘to ruin oneself by extravagance in food’ is the city’s unofficial motto, and who are we to argue with that?
Osaka is a unique place that is to be experienced rather than seen – whilst there isn’t a huge amount to visit, there is plenty of ambience to soak up, extremely friendly locals to meet and fascinating areas to wander.

Be First to Post Comment !
Post a Comment

Custom Post Signature

Custom Post  Signature